Saturday, January 20, 2018

White Muslin and the African Slave Trade

From Racked:
In 1783, portrait artist Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun painted Marie Antoinette in a simple cotton gown known as a robe de gaulle. The thin white fabric is airy and loose, cinched at the waist with a sheer golden sash. Full sleeves and a softly ruffled neckline add volume to the otherwise unstructured shape. She doesn’t wear any jewels or embellishments, just a wide-brimmed straw hat tied with a ribbon band, topped with a few relatively modest plumes.

The painting has a graceful and arcadian feel to it, at least to the modern eye. The scene is refreshingly natural when compared to the ornateness of the typical Rococo-era portrait. The gown gives off “an aesthetic of rustic simplicity,” writes Katy Werlin in Clothing and Fashion: American Fashion From Head to Toe. Despite its humble appearance, though, Marie Antoinette’s portrait in the plain cotton dress had an impact that reverberated through the world in ways no one could have foreseen. It flipped the textile industry on its head, lighting the fuse laid out by a fast-changing world of exploration, Enlightenment, and rebellion. It caused cotton, and the institution of slavery it stood on, to explode. (Read more.)
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Friday, January 19, 2018

The Imprisonment of Mary Stuart

From Smithsonian:
This frosty missive belongs to a trove of 43 letters that was recently donated to the American Trust for the British Library. The documents in this remarkable collection, which include four letters signed by Elizabeth I and others written by high-ranking officials like Sir Francis Walsingham, all relate to Mary’s imprisonment in England, where she was held for 19 years before her execution.

Mary fled to England in 1568, after an uprising forced her to abdicate the Scottish throne in favor of her infant son. She hoped that her cousin, Elizabeth, would offer refuge, but Mary’s arrival unnerved the English queen. Mary was Catholic; Elizabeth was a Protestant. Concerned that Mary would become the focus of plots to depose her and install a Catholic monarch, Elizabeth ordered her cousin to be placed under the strict supervision of English noblemen.

For most of her long confinement, Mary was kept at a manor in Derbyshire, in the custody of the Earl of Shrewsbury. But in 1584, she was moved to a dreary castle further inland, and transferred to the charge of the statesman Ralph Sadler. The British Library’s newest collection of letters span the period in which Mary was in Sadler’s care, from the summer of 1584 to the spring of 1585. It was a tumultuous time for both the Scottish queen and Europe at large. Religious wars were raging in France, the Protestant William of Orange had been assassinated by a “fanatical Catholic,” and a plot against Elizabeth’s life had recently been foiled. With the possibility of insurrection and assassination lurking constantly in the shadows, Elizabeth and her supporters became increasingly nervous about Mary. (Read more.)
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A President Who Fights

From Town Hall:
General George Patton was a vulgar-talking, son-of-a-bitch.  In peacetime, this might have seen him stripped of rank.  But, had Franklin Roosevelt applied the normal rules of decorum, then Hitler and the Socialists would barely be five decades into their thousand-year Reich.

Trump is fighting.  And what’s particularly delicious is that, like Patton standing over the battlefield as his tanks obliterated Rommel’s, he’s shouting, “You magnificent bastards, I read your book!”  That is just the icing on the cake, but it’s wonderful to see that not only is Trump fighting, he’s defeating the Left using their own tactics.

That book is Saul Alinsky’s Rules for Radicals – a book so essential to the Liberals’ war against America that it is and was the playbook for the entire Obama administration and the subject of Hillary Clinton’s senior thesis.   It is a book of such pure evil, that, just as the rest of us would dedicate our book to those we most love or those to whom we are most indebted, Alinsky dedicated his book to Lucifer. Trump’s tweets may seem rash and unconsidered but, in reality, he is doing exactly what Alinsky suggested his followers do.

First, instead of going after “the fake media” – and they are so fake that they have literally gotten every single significant story of the past 60 years not just wrong, but diametrically opposed to the truth, from the Tet Offensive to Benghazi, to what really happened on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri – Trump isolated CNN.  He made it personal.  Then, just as Alinsky suggests, he employs ridicule which Alinsky described as “the most powerful weapon of all. (Read more.)
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The Muslim Slave Trade

From Dr. Taylor Marshall:
A few days ago I wrote about how Pope Zachary banned the selling of slaves in Rome. The slave trade in Italy was focused on the selling of Europeans to Muslims. People often neglect the fact that this slave trade was sexually and racially motivated. What I am about to write is politically incorrect, but the historical facts bear witness to it: Muslim men wanted to purchase fair skinned, blonde or redheaded European girls as sex slaves. It didn’t start with the film Taken. (Read more.)
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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Lauren Rossi's Gowns


 From the Daily Mail:
Just outside Central Park, on New York City's Upper East Side, Lauren Rossi is waiting for an UberPOOL, looking as if she had just stepped out of the 18th century – with a twist. The elegant, deep blue gown she is wearing – dyed in an ombre, with gold leaf around the wide hooped skirt and overdress and intricate embroidered beading on the bodice – is completely handmade by Lauren herself, inspired by the Rococo style of the 18th century. She does have some 'modern' accents, as well, including gold makeup flecks she applied above her cheekbones and her necklace and earrings, which are mourning jewelry dated from 1913.

Over her shoulders, she is wearing a 1960s fur collar, and on her left forearm she is wearing a fur muff from about the 1950s – which is her guess because of the metal zipper inside – while she holds her iPhone in her right, checking on when her UberPOOL is supposed to arrive. 'I'm convinced in my Uber rating it says "dresses weird",' Lauren says. As she talks, the feathers pinned to her done-up hair move with her.

She might not look like it, but Lauren works a corporate job in New York City. She is a brand manager and does product development for the mass market apparel industry, including yoga pants and 'casual clothes', but in her spare time – practically all of her spare time – she makes intricately designed gowns inspired by 18th century fashion by hand.
'I just feel complete when I dress like this,' she tells DailyMail.com. 'I feel like it's a way of expressing myself, it's a way of embracing a femininity that I like and so, it just feels right.' (Read more.)
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The Poverty Capital of America

California. From the Los Angeles Times:
Guess which state has the highest poverty rate in the country? Not Mississippi, New Mexico, or West Virginia, but California, where nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing, food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.Given robust job growth and the prosperity generated by several industries, it’s worth asking why California has fallen behind, especially when the state’s per-capita GDP increased approximately twice as much as the U.S. average over the five years ending in 2016 (12.5%, compared with 6.27%).

 It’s not as though California policymakers have neglected to wage war on poverty. Sacramento and local governments have spent massive amounts in the cause. Several state and municipal benefit programs overlap with one another; in some cases, individuals with incomes 200% above the poverty line receive benefits. California state and local governments spent nearly $958 billion from 1992 through 2015 on public welfare programs, including cash-assistance payments, vendor payments and “other public welfare,” according to the Census Bureau. California, with 12% of the American population, is home today to about one in three of the nation’s welfare recipients. (Read more.)
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The Axis Diplomats

From The Washington Post:
It’s one of the most striking images of Washington from just after the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor: Smoke rising from the garden of the Japanese Embassy on Massachusetts Avenue NW as diplomats burned box after box of secret documents. But have you ever wondered what happened next?
 
Harvey Solomon did — and the Takoma Park, Md., writer is hoping there are still some people around who recall one of the oddest episodes of the World War II home front: more than 1,000 employees from Axis embassies — diplomats, their families, staff and servants — were sent from Washington to live in luxury hotels.

“The FBI and the State Department wanted them out of the embassies,” Solomon said. “They might still be communicating via radio, and they had diplomatic pouches. All that had to end.”

The solution was to move them to the countryside. The first ones to go were the Germans, headed by acting Ambassador Hans Thomsen and his glamorous wife, Bebe. On Dec. 19, 1941, they were taken by special train from Union Station to White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. They would be cooling their heels at the Greenbrier resort. (Read more.)
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Branching Out

From the Trianon Health and Beauty Blog:
Trianon Bouquet Beauty Products are now available internationally, not just in America. To estimate the cost of shipping, just click under the price where it says "shipping to" and Etsy will figure it out. Meanwhile, we have been receiving positive feedback from customers about how the creams are helping them to survive the frigid temperatures. One young lady with dry rough cracked hands says the the Midnight Bouquet Night Cream is the only thing that really helps her skin to heal. The cream can also be used on dry elbows and feet, and as a hair masque on stressed hair. (Read more.)
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